Retina Gallery ~ Full Sized Retina Images

Library of Free, Non-Copyrighted Retina Images and Videos

Choose your language:



68-year-old woman. I did get her medical records from her doctor at the Naval Ambulatory Care Center and I have records going back to 2003, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. The patient did recount that while I was talking to her that the plaques in the retinas have been noted for some time. She is having some difficulty reading scores on the television set and came to see you because of that and there is concern about her cataracts. You saw the retinal problems and suggested she come in here for evaluation. She does have a history of high blood pressure and high cholesterol. She is not diabetic. She does have a history of stroke. VISUAL ACUITY: OD 20/40, OS 20/20. IOP: OD 17, OS 12. SLIT LAMP EXAM: There is 2+ nuclear sclerosis in both eyes. EXTENDED OPHTHALMOSCOPY: OD: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.3. There is posterior vitreous separation. There are patchy retinal arterial atheromata along the inferotemporal and a few along the inferonasal branch retinal artery. There were no occlusions or hemorrhages. OS: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.3. There is posterior vitreous separation. Again, there are a few atheromata along the inferotemporal branch retinal artery. There is a chorioretinal scar in the inferotemporal periphery. Photos confirm clinical findings. FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAM: FA shows patent retinal vasculature throughout. OCT SCAN: Shows minimal retinal atrophy inferiorly in both eyes. IMPRESSION: 1. RETINAL ARTERIAL ATHEROMATA – BOTH EYES 2. POSSIBLE PREVIOUS RETINAL VASCULAR INCIDENT – BOTH EYES DISCUSSION: I explained to the patient that she does have deposits in the retinal arteries in both eyes, which look to be cholesterol calcium deposits, but they are yellow and on the walls of the retinal vessels. Her visual field does show defects superiorly, which correspond to the areas of atheromata inferiorly and I suspect what has happened here is she has had either an occlusion or hypertensive episode, or something which damaged the branch retinal arteries inferotemporally in both eyes and have left her with these calcium deposits along the vessel walls, which are chronic.

atheromatapama.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata125 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28129.jpg
Retinal Arterial Atheromata163 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28229.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata104 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28329.jpg
Retinal Arterial Atheromata212 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28529.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata85 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28429~0.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata94 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28629.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata67 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28729.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata78 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28829.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata74 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
atheromatapama_28929.png
Retinal Arterial Atheromata99 views68-year-old woman with records going back 7 years, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. 00000
(0 votes)
Add to Favorites
   
10 files on 1 page(s)
Favorites Actions
           

68-year-old woman. I did get her medical records from her doctor at the Naval Ambulatory Care Center and I have records going back to 2003, which clearly document retinal arterial plaques in both eyes. The patient did recount that while I was talking to her that the plaques in the retinas have been noted for some time. She is having some difficulty reading scores on the television set and came to see you because of that and there is concern about her cataracts. You saw the retinal problems and suggested she come in here for evaluation. She does have a history of high blood pressure and high cholesterol. She is not diabetic. She does have a history of stroke. VISUAL ACUITY: OD 20/40, OS 20/20. IOP: OD 17, OS 12. SLIT LAMP EXAM: There is 2+ nuclear sclerosis in both eyes. EXTENDED OPHTHALMOSCOPY: OD: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.3. There is posterior vitreous separation. There are patchy retinal arterial atheromata along the inferotemporal and a few along the inferonasal branch retinal artery. There were no occlusions or hemorrhages. OS: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.3. There is posterior vitreous separation. Again, there are a few atheromata along the inferotemporal branch retinal artery. There is a chorioretinal scar in the inferotemporal periphery. Photos confirm clinical findings. FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAM: FA shows patent retinal vasculature throughout. OCT SCAN: Shows minimal retinal atrophy inferiorly in both eyes. IMPRESSION: 1. RETINAL ARTERIAL ATHEROMATA – BOTH EYES 2. POSSIBLE PREVIOUS RETINAL VASCULAR INCIDENT – BOTH EYES DISCUSSION: I explained to the patient that she does have deposits in the retinal arteries in both eyes, which look to be cholesterol calcium deposits, but they are yellow and on the walls of the retinal vessels. Her visual field does show defects superiorly, which correspond to the areas of atheromata inferiorly and I suspect what has happened here is she has had either an occlusion or hypertensive episode, or something which damaged the branch retinal arteries inferotemporally in both eyes and have left her with these calcium deposits along the vessel walls, which are chronic.