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34-year-old woman was seen in the office on 9/22/2009. She does not have a family history of vision problems. She recently had a child delivered by cesarean section. She saw you because she is having some difficulty seeing at night, especially navigating through dark movie theaters and dark restaurants. You saw a problem with the retina and suggested she come in here for an evaluation. VISUAL ACUITY: Vision OD is 20/30, OS is 20/30. IOP: 12 OU. AMSLER GRID: Normal in both eyes. SLIT LAMP EXAM: Normal with clear lenses. EXTENDED OPHTHALMOSCOPY: OD: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.2. There is no posterior vitreous separation. There is a bulls-eye macular dystrophy with a ring of atrophy around the fovea, starting about 1000 microns from the fovea, and then in the periphery at the equator, there is also a ring of bone spicule pigment migration into the retina. The nerve is slightly pale. The retinal vessels look reasonable. OS: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.2. There is no posterior vitreous separation. The eye looks exactly the same, again with a ring of atrophy centrally and then a ring in the periphery. IMPRESSION: 1. RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA – BOTH EYES 2. ROD CONE DYSTOPHY – BOTH EYES DISCUSSION: I explained to the patient she does have retinal dystrophy which is primarily affecting the peripheral retina but is now also affecting the macula. This is consistent with a variant of retinitis pigmentosa. Many of the retinitis pigmentosa subtypes do ultimately affect the central vision and it does look like she has some characteristics such as you would see in a cone dystrophy. At this point, unfortunately there is no treatment for her, but there is some exciting research in gene treatments for retinal dystrophies and it is possible within the next few years something might become available. In the meantime, I suggest she return for check in two years.

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Cone-Rod Dystrophy 556 views34-year-old woman who is having some difficulty seeing at night, especially navigating through dark movie theaters and dark restaurants. OD is 20/30, OS is 20/3044444
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Cone-Rod Dystrophy 478 views34-year-old woman who is having some difficulty seeing at night, especially navigating through dark movie theaters and dark restaurants. OD is 20/30, OS is 20/3000000
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34-year-old woman was seen in the office on 9/22/2009. She does not have a family history of vision problems. She recently had a child delivered by cesarean section. She saw you because she is having some difficulty seeing at night, especially navigating through dark movie theaters and dark restaurants. You saw a problem with the retina and suggested she come in here for an evaluation. VISUAL ACUITY: Vision OD is 20/30, OS is 20/30. IOP: 12 OU. AMSLER GRID: Normal in both eyes. SLIT LAMP EXAM: Normal with clear lenses. EXTENDED OPHTHALMOSCOPY: OD: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.2. There is no posterior vitreous separation. There is a bulls-eye macular dystrophy with a ring of atrophy around the fovea, starting about 1000 microns from the fovea, and then in the periphery at the equator, there is also a ring of bone spicule pigment migration into the retina. The nerve is slightly pale. The retinal vessels look reasonable. OS: Vertical C/D ratio is 0.2. There is no posterior vitreous separation. The eye looks exactly the same, again with a ring of atrophy centrally and then a ring in the periphery. IMPRESSION: 1. RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA – BOTH EYES 2. ROD CONE DYSTOPHY – BOTH EYES DISCUSSION: I explained to the patient she does have retinal dystrophy which is primarily affecting the peripheral retina but is now also affecting the macula. This is consistent with a variant of retinitis pigmentosa. Many of the retinitis pigmentosa subtypes do ultimately affect the central vision and it does look like she has some characteristics such as you would see in a cone dystrophy. At this point, unfortunately there is no treatment for her, but there is some exciting research in gene treatments for retinal dystrophies and it is possible within the next few years something might become available. In the meantime, I suggest she return for check in two years.